What happened the last time ACL was canceled due to rain?

Weather
Austin City Limits, Zilker Park_65527

AUSTIN (KXAN) — In the nearly 20 years since the first Austin City Limits Music Festival in 2002, there has been only one weather-related cancelation. On Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, festival organizers announced current weather conditions — including a flash-flood warning — had spurred the show’s cancelation.

Historic data from our very own KXAN Weather Diary shows that on Oct. 13, 2013, Austin recorded 4.22 inches of rain at Camp Mabry. The minimum temperature for the day was listed as 66.2 degrees, with a maximum temperature of 80.1 degrees. Portions of Travis County received over a foot of rain

Attendees received a refund equal to one-third their ticket price due to the cancelation.

However, this is by no means the only incident of inclement weather during the six-day, two-weekend festival. In most circumstances, ACL operates as a rain or shine event and continues performances unless the weather forecast threatens the safety of attendees.

For weekend one festivalgoers, you might not want to break out your favorite pair of shoes and opt for ponchos and rainboots instead: the weekend forecast includes between 30%-80% chances of rain and thunderstorms.
(Note: UMBRELLAS ARE PROHIBITED WITHIN ACL GROUNDS)

  • Friday: 80% chance of rain, thunderstorms; high of 82 degrees, low of 67 degrees
  • Saturday: 80% chance of rain, thunderstorms; high of 81 degrees, low of 68 degrees
  • Sunday: 20% chance of scattered showers; high of 85 degrees, low of 66 degrees.

KXAN reached out to festival organizers to ask what specific weather circumstances lead to a cancelation. We will update this story if a response is received.

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