AUSTIN (KXAN) — If you looked up at the sky Wednesday night, you were treated to a rare sight: a blue supermoon.

According to NASA, a ‘supermoon’ occurs when a full moon passes through ‘perigee,’ or the point in its orbit when it’s closest to Earth, causing it to appear large and bright in the sky. A ‘blue moon’ occurs when a full moon is seen twice in a single month.

KXAN viewers sent in photos from across Central Texas:

  • A blue supermoon seen from Horseshoe Bay on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Barbara Hunley)
  • A blue supermoon seen from Driftwood on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Gary Clark)
  • A blue supermoon seen from south Round Rock on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Leslie Priddy)
  • A blue supermoon seen from southwest Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Barry Johnson)
  • vvvvA blue supermoon seen from southwest Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Barry Johnson)
  • A blue supermoon seen from Point Venture on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Miguel Paz Baeza)
  • A blue supermoon seen from downtown Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Barbra Waldare)
  • A blue supermoon seen over Lake Georgetown on Aug. 30, 2023. (KXAN Viewer Photo)
  • The moon, as seen in south Austin, on Aug. 29, 2023, just days before a blue supermoon. (Courtesy Earl McGehee).
  • A blue supermoon seen from downtown Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Barbra Waldare)
  • A blue supermoon seen from south Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (KXAN Viewer Photo)
  • A blue supermoon seen from Salado on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Mackenzie Mayo)
  • A blue supermoon seen from Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy John)
  • A blue supermoon seen from Austin on Aug. 30, 2023. (Courtesy Bobbie Mier)

NASA said the next blue supermoons would occur in a pair in January and March 2037.