AUSTIN (KXAN) — Hotter and drier weather returns midweek but a wetter pattern change will soon follow.

Our temps are trending hotter today and tomorrow with most areas likely to top 100°+. By Wednesday, we will be tied for 4th place for the highest 100-degree day count in any given year – 66 days.

High pressure displaced to our north, in addition to a boundary sinking south from North Texas, will allow for better rain chances later this week. Scattered showers and storms are looking likely Thursday and Friday with most forecast models bringing hopes of 0.5″-1″ for many areas. Some, however, will unfortunately miss out on rainfall.

In anticipation of the clouds and rain showers, temperatures will “cool” slightly with afternoon highs in the upper 90s Friday through the weekend.

Monday was Camp Mabry’s 49th-consecutive day without measurable rainfall — our 11th-longest dry spell in recorded history.

First Warning

While we will certainly still have some hot, dry days to come in August and September, the worst of the searing summer heat may be behind us. New 8-14 day outlooks from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center show wetter/cooler than normal weather in late August, and extended-range forecast models are hinting at more heat relief and scattered rainfall in September.

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Summer heat

Following Austin’s first official day of triple-digit heat, back on May 21, the First Warning Weather team each came up with their own predictions for how many 100° days we’ll see this year. Follow along through the summer with the chart below. Camp Mabry is in the midst of its hottest summer on record.

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