AUSTIN (KXAN) — Clouds during the early to mid-afternoon kept temperatures just slightly cooler Wednesday, but we were still hot! We broke the record high at Austin’s Camp Mabry reaching 98 degrees, beating the previous record of 97 set in 1925 on this day. The record high was also broken at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport reaching 97, beating the previous record of 96 set in 2018.

Record high Wednesday
Record high Wednesday

Tonight will be mainly clear aside from some patchy low clouds developing into the early morning.

We’re in for another hot day on Thursday with temperatures heading back into the upper 90s. It will probably be hotter given our expectation for a mostly sunny sky. The record high for Thursday at Austin’s Camp Mabry stands at 98 degrees set in 2008 and we’re forecasting a high of 99.

A pattern change arrives late week with daily rain chances starting Friday and continuing through the weekend and beyond.

Rain or storm coverage on Friday and Saturday looks isolated to widely scattered. Friday’s storms carry a low severe weather risk, especially north and northwest of Austin where a Marginal (Level 1 out of 5) severe weather threat is in place.

Low risk of severe storms in our northern counties Friday.

Rain chances jump higher for Sunday and especially early next week.

Rainfall projections have jumped with higher confidence of widespread wet weather early next week. This would be welcome rainfall, although not drought busting. If this rain comes too quickly then some flash flooding might become a problem, especially in more urban areas not as able to handle the runoff.

7 Day Rainfall Forecast (NWS)
7 Day Rainfall Forecast (NWS)

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