AUSTIN (KXAN) — A hot Saturday afternoon with temperatures in the 90s slow to fall this evening. Expect a warm night (70s/80s) under a mostly clear to partly cloudy sky.

Daytime heating interacting with the sea breeze is allowing for a few spot showers in our eastern counties this afternoon. Expect another low chance of a spot shower Sunday afternoon as well (10% chance east of I-35).

We welcome the first cold front of the fall season. It arrives Monday. Some models have it arriving before sunrise but it’s a pretty good bet that the front will be south of the area during the afternoon and evening. It delivers dry air.

Highs will drop from the mid 90s Monday and Tuesday to around 90° Thursday and Friday. Some morning lows, especially in the Hill Country, will fall to the middle to upper 50s Thursday and Friday.

What’s better is that dew points will be in the 40s from Tuesday to Friday.

Noticeably dry air is headed our way

Tropical Update

We are monitoring Tropical Storm Ian in the Caribbean. The 4 a.m. CDT update from the National Hurricane Center places the storm 315 miles SE of Kingston, Jamaica and 600 miles ESE of Grand Cayman. The storm will become a hurricane in the next 36 to 48 hours. It is expected to hit the U.S. as a strong hurricane next week. Read the latest updates below:

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Summer Heat

Meteorological summer ended on Aug. 31, as Camp Mabry recorded its second-hottest summer in recorded history. Austin-Bergstrom recorded its 7th-hottest summer on record.

Preliminary data indicates the entire state of Texas recorded its second-hottest summer on record this year.

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