HARLINGEN, Texas (ValleyCentral) — Texas’ system of reservoirs showed a slight increase in water levels Thursday, compared to a week ago.

The Texas Water Development Board updated its data, showing all the state’s reservoirs combined put the state’s water supply at slightly higher than 68% capacity.

But a year ago, the state’s water storage was 15.5% higher than it is now, according to the TWDB. The difference between then and now is a little shy of 2.8 million acre-feet.

“An acre-foot is the amount of water it would take to cover an acre of land one foot deep in water — that’s a football field minus the end zones, one foot deep in water,” states the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department on its Texas: The State of Water website.

Does having nearly 2.8 million acre-feet less water over 2021 mean Texans have less water to flood out Friday night football a few million times? Yes. But more seriously, that amount of water represents what could be consumed by 84,000 Texas football fans every year.

“Americans use at least 100 gallons or more per day,” TPWD stated online. “Texas is the second largest user of water in the United States. Some Texas cities average more than 250 gallons per person per day (33 cubic feet).”

Yet, Texans who go to their nearest reservoirs could witness vastly different scenarios, depending on where they live in the state. Some reservoirs are completely filled while others are puddles. The state’s 68% water level on Thursday reflects the combination of all these reservoirs’ levels.

The 10 driest reservoirs in Texas*

The driest in the state is the Palo Duro Reservoir, about 100 miles north of Amarillo in the Texas Panhandle. Palo Duro only has 275 acre-feet of water, enough to quench the annual needs of about 8 Texans.

Reservoir

Palo Duro Reservoir

OC Fisher

Mackenzie

Medina Lake

Elephant Butte

Greenbelt Lake

Falcon Lake

White River

EV Spence

J B Thomas

Water Level

0.5%

3.2%

6.3%

6.9%

7.5%

12.3%

14.2%

14.7%

19%

25.7%

Location

North of Amarillo

San Angelo

Briscoe County

Near Bandera

New Mexico (Serves Texas)

Texas Panhandle

Near Laredo

Near Crosbyton

Coke County

Near Snyder

The 10 wettest reservoirs in Texas*

There are reservoirs with more water, simply because they are physically larger. However, these are the reservoirs with the highest percentages against capacity.

Reservoir

Grapevine Lake

Lake Houston

Mountain Creek Lake

Squaw Creek Reservoir

Wright Patman Lake

Lake Arlington

Livingston Reservoir

Lake Lyndon B. Johnson

BA Steinhagen Lake

Water Level

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

99.9%

99%

98.7%

97.1%

Location

Near Dallas/Fort Worth

Near Houston

Dallas

Near Glen Rose

Near Texarkana

Arlington

Livingston

Near Austin

Near Jasper

*Note: The comparisons are based on each reservoir’s percentage against its total capacity, according to data provided by the Texas Water Development Board.