WEB EXCLUSIVE: Put That 2020 Wine To Good Use With A DIY Cork Crown

Studio 512

Studio 512 is wishing Stephanie a very happy birthday! Ahead of her big day, Rosie crafted a DIY crown made with leftover wine corks (and a shout-out to our boss, Korey, for providing said corks)! Rosie was inspired by TikTok creator @ProudAmericanMama, who calls herself the “#OGCorkCrown” queen.

Plenty of corks is a great place to start, because you'll likely need extras along the way.
Plenty of corks is a great place to start, because you’ll likely need extras along the way.

You’ll need:

  • 15-25 wine corks (Rosie’s exact crown uses 23, but the original creator’s crown is slightly smaller and uses fewer corks. There’s an element of making-it-up-as-you-go to this).
  • Standard glue gun and glue sticks.
  • Flexible headband, especially if you’re making the crown for someone else — the recipient will be able to mold it to fit their own head! Rosie has used the Scunci type twice now for gluing projects, and they work like a charm. You can find them on Amazon.
  • Jewels, if you’re feeling fancy. Rosie used almost every single one of this type, found on Amazon.
Costume jewels in assorted colors are a fun way to jazz up the beige-colored crown.
Costume jewels in assorted colors are a fun way to jazz up the beige-colored crown.

Method

First, Rosie watched @ProudAmericanMama’s crown from different angles, then started mapping out what corks were needed on a flat table, while the glue gun was heating up. The headband actually sits around your hairline or temple, more like a crown than a tiara or where you’d normally wear a headband. If you’ve done it right, the headband’s “ear pieces” will be pointing behind you.

Laying out the angles of your corks -- and matching cork colors -- can help you get a visual.
Laying out the angles of your corks — and matching cork colors — can help you get a visual.

Rosie started with the middle of the crown, slowly working her way up, out and back. The original creator does two things that really stand out: she builds her crowns so that each higher level curves back, mimicking the shape of the head, and she also uses jewels in teardrop shapes to make the crown look like it tapers at the top. Keep trying your crown on in the mirror if you’re worried about the flow. Rosie tried to do both of these things, but ended up with a “more is more” method.

The corks curve with the crown for a more "stately" appearance.
The corks curve with the crown for a more “stately” appearance.

The circles that @ProudAmericanMama uses are just the ends of the cork: getting these is easier said than done. Since cutting the corks leaves an unsightly ring, you’ll only get two circles per cork. Cut them with a sharp knife on a cutting board for the best outcome.

The finished crown may not win awards, but it's a fun and heartfelt birthday gift!
The finished crown may not win awards, but it’s a fun and heartfelt birthday gift!

Tips: the cork material really seems to like hot glue — it clings to it in a way most materials don’t, which makes the crown really sturdy. The corks, since they’re a little elastic, will give you more “wiggle” room if you need to shift things around on your crown. Feel free to push and mold something you’ve already glued to get it into the spot you want!

If all of this just seems like too much work, visit @ProudAmericanMama’s Etsy shop to buy one. Happy wining!

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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