New Year, New Books At BookPeople

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Eyes That Kiss in the Corners by Joanna Ho, illus. by Dung Ho (January 5th, 2020)

This lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity.

A young Asian girl notices that her eyes look different from her peers’. They have big, round eyes and long lashes. She realizes that her eyes are like her mother’s, her grandmother’s, and her little sister’s. They have eyes that kiss in the corners and glow like warm tea, crinkle into crescent moons, and are filled with stories of the past and hope for the future.

Drawing from the strength of these powerful women in her life, she recognizes her own beauty and discovers a path to self-love and empowerment. This powerful, poetic picture book will resonate with readers of all ages.

The ABCs of Black History by Rio Cortez, illus. by Lauren Semmer (December 8th, 2020)

“B is for Beautiful, Brave, and Bright! And for a Book that takes a Bold journey through the alphabet of Black history and culture. Letter by letter, The ABCs of Black History celebrates a story that spans continents and centuries, triumph and heartbreak, creativity and joy.

It’s a story of big ideas––P is for Power, S is for Science and Soul. Of significant moments––G is for Great Migration. Of iconic figures––H is for Zora Neale Hurston, X is for Malcom X. It’s an ABC book like no other, and a story of hope and love.

BookPeople will be hosting an event with the author and illustrator on February 11th, 2021!

Milo Imagines the World by Matt de la Pena, illus. by Christian Robinson (February 2nd, 2021)

The team behind the Newbery Medal winner and Caldecott Honor book Last Stop on Market Street and the award-winning New York Times bestseller Carmela Full of Wishes once again delivers a poignant and timely picture book that’s sure to become an instant classic.

Milo is on a long subway ride with his older sister. To pass the time, he studies the faces around him and makes pictures of their lives. There’s the whiskered man with the crossword puzzle; Milo imagines him playing solitaire in a cluttered apartment full of pets. There’s the wedding-dressed woman with a little dog peeking out of her handbag; Milo imagines her in a grand cathedral ceremony. And then there’s the boy in the suit with the bright white sneakers; Milo imagines him arriving home to a castle with a drawbridge and a butler. But when the boy in the suit gets off on the same stop as Milo–walking the same path, going to the exact same place–Milo realizes that you can’t really know anyone just by looking at them.

New Books For Adults To Add To Their Reading List:

Black Buck by Mateo Askaripour (January 5th, 2021

For fans of Sorry to Bother You and The Wolf of Wall Street—a crackling, satirical debut novel about a young man given a shot at stardom as the lone Black salesman at a mysterious, cult-like, and wildly successful startup where nothing is as it seems.

Black Buck is a hilarious, razor-sharp skewering of America’s workforce; it is a propulsive, crackling debut that explores ambition and race, and makes way for a necessary new vision of the American dream.

The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr. (January 5th, 2021)

A singular and stunning debut novel about the forbidden union between two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation, the refuge they find in each other, and a betrayal that threatens their existence.

Mythic, epic, prophetic, mystic, poetic, erotic, magic, pyrogenic, majestic, authentic—all these words should be lavished on this debut novel from Robert Jones Jr. At its heart, though, The Prophets is simply a provocative and powerful love story—that of Jones’ love for those whose voices were repressed as they were oppressed. Set on a Mississippi plantation, Jones explores the iterations and consequences of love through the experiences of the enslaved Black people of Empty. The story centers on Isaiah and Samuel, two young men who love each other and who do not wish to be forced into any other relationship as dictated by the Massa or any of the other slaves. I love the subversive blend of Christian scripture and spiritualism that permeates The Prophets and the unique blend of voices Jones brings forth. Readers will willingly let their hearts be broken by this must-read social justice novel.”

Christine Havens, BookPeople Bookseller

Infinite Country by Patricia Engel (March 2nd, 2021)

For readers of Valeria Luiselli and Edwidge Danticat, an urgent and lyrical novel about a Colombian family fractured by deportation, offering an intimate perspective on an experience that so many have endured—and are enduring right now.

Talia is being held at a correctional facility for adolescent girls in the forested mountains of Colombia after committing an impulsive act of violence that may or may not have been warranted. She urgently needs to get out and get back home to Bogotá, where her father and a plane ticket to the United States are waiting for her. If she misses her flight, she might also miss her chance to finally be reunited with her family in the north.

How this family came to occupy two different countries, two different worlds, comes into focus like twists of a kaleidoscope. We see Talia’s parents, Mauro and Elena, fall in love in a market stall as teenagers against a backdrop of civil war and social unrest. We see them leave Bogotá with their firstborn, Karina, in pursuit of safety and opportunity in the United States on a temporary visa, and we see the births of two more children, Nando and Talia, on American soil. We witness the decisions and indecisions that lead to Mauro’s deportation and the family’s splintering—the costs they’ve all been living with ever since.

Award-winning, internationally acclaimed author Patricia Engel, herself a dual citizen and the daughter of Colombian immigrants, gives voice to all five family members as they navigate the particulars of their respective circumstances. And all the while, the metronome ticks: Will Talia make it to Bogotá in time? And if she does, can she bring herself to trade the solid facts of her father and life in Colombia for the distant vision of her mother and siblings in America?

Rich with Bogotá urban life, steeped in Andean myth, and tense with the daily reality of the undocumented in America, Infinite Country is the story of two countries and one mixed-status family—for whom every triumph is stitched with regret, and every dream pursued bears the weight of a dream deferred.

Patricia Engel has done it again and this time it feels more powerful than ever before. Infinite Country is a story that leaves no feeling behind and with just a few pages in writing tells the life-long journey of Mauro, Elena, Karina, Nando, and Talia; A family fighting at all odds to stay together. This book left me too quickly, but their story will stick with me forever.”

Cristina Lebrón, BookPeople Bookeseller

BookPeople are currently offering online ordering and curbside pick up!

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