Cryotherapy: A stone cold benefit for athletes … except for Raiders’ Brown

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — Welcome to the future, where instead of just an ice bath, you can choose a nitrogen-fueled cryo chamber.

“It’s essentially kind of like an advanced ice bath,” Caulen Lauria, owner of Cryo Body Works, said. “We’re dealing with cold exposure to stimulate nutrient-rich, anti-inflammatory-rich blood flow for a variety of different benefits.”

At Cryo Body Works in North Austin, treatment lasts for a maximum of three minutes in a chamber set to -220 degrees Fahrenheit.

[It] has to be that cold to get proper effects,” Lauria said. “That’s all your skin can allowably tolerate.”

Speaking from experience, three minutes is plenty of time.

“There’s a systemic release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that takes place from your body’s exposure to this temperature change,” Lauria said.

Cryotherapy has become a go-to for high-level athletes wanting to recover, including at Texas, where Tom Herman is always emphasizing his team takes care of its bodies.

“It’s part of the ingrained culture of who we are,” Herman said. “We take that very seriously. It’s what we call being a pro. These guys, guys in the NFL, they spend a lot of time and money on their bodies because that’s their living.”

Raiders receiver Antonio Brown was trying to do just that, but reports say he entered a cryo chamber without proper footwear.

“We can understand that these athletes have a desire to heal quickly and they’re kind of willing to go to any extreme to make that possible,” Lauria said. “There’s a reason why we have these protocols set up. I can see why that happens, but it’s certainly outside the guidelines of what’s required.”

A sub-zero mistake that Brown won’t make twice.

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