BLOG: Results weren’t finalized until 3:40 a.m. Wednesday

Your Local Election HQ

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Texans voted Tuesday on a number of local and statewide propositions. Here is a live blog of the results:

Election resources:

4 a.m.

The final election results did not come in until 3:40 a.m. on Wednesday, the morning after Tuesday’s election. There was a surge in voting on Election Day, leading to 122,059 people casting a ballot, or 15.17% of registered voters.

While this was quite good for an off-year election in which there were no major political candidates on the ballot, it is still well below vote totals on a primary or general election during a presidential election. That raises some concerns going in to 2020.

Election workers return paper ballots to Travis County Clerk's Office
Workers bring in paper ballots of election results to the Travis County Clerk’s Office around 3 a.m. Nov. 6, 2019, the morning after Election Day. (KXAN Photo/Todd Bailey)

10:45 p.m.

Early results showed voters approved Proposition 4, making it harder for the state to have an income tax. Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted about the proposition saying, “Thank you, Texans!!!! Future generations of Texans will thank you too.”

10:30 p.m.

The Travis County Clerk’s Office said that everyone did not finish voting until after 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday. Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir explained to KXAN that there were many polling locations with long lines which kept people voting late into the evening.

In particular, DeBeauvoir said, many of these long lines happened in grocery stores. She anticipates that the results from each of those polling places with people voting late would not be physically delivered to the Travis County Clerk’s Office until around 10:30 p.m.

As of 9:45 p.m. a line of cars was outside the Travis County Clerk’s office, all waiting to drop off election results. 

10:25 p.m.

10:15 p.m.

Texas voters voted in support of Proposition 5, a dedication of revenue from the Sporting Goods Sales tax, so those funds could only be used by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Historical Commission on public parks and historic sites.

The proposition would ensure funding to help protect Texas water quality, natural areas, beaches and wildlife. It will also create a consistent stream of revenue for maintenance and long-term planning for state parks and historic sites, without raising taxes or requiring additional fees.

10:00 p.m.

There were still lines at 15 polling locations across Travis County. 

Voting results as of 10 p.m. show the city of Austin’s Proposition B failing with 57% of votes against and 43% for it. Austin’s Prop. B would mean the city needs voter approval for improvements to the Austin Convention Center which cost more than $20 million. It also limits how much hotel occupancy tax money can go toward the convention center: 34% to the center and 36% to supporting Austin’s cultural tourism industry.

9:36 p.m.

Lockhart ISD announced that based on unofficial results from the bond election indicate 45% for the bond and 55% against it. “The bond did not pass,” says Superintendent Mark Estrada. LISD says that the results are not official, however, until final canvassing at a board meeting Nov. 11.

9:25 p.m.

Travis County Proposition A: Current voting totals indicate 63.92% voted for and 37.07% voted against the proposition.

9:16 p.m.

Williamson County Prop A ($412 million in road bonds): 64% for and 36% against, 12 of 58 precincts reported.

Williamson County Prop B ($35 million): 59% for and 41% against, 12 of 58 precincts reported.

8:54 p.m.

Texas Prop 1 (would allow municipal judges to hold multiple offices): 65% against and 35% for with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 2 (Water development bonds): 65% for and 35% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 3 (property tax exemption for disaster areas): 86% for and 14% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 4 (would prohibit state income tax on individuals): 75% for and 25% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 5 (would dedicate sporting goods sales tax to parks): 86% for and 14% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 6 (would increase maximum bonds for CPRIT): 65% for and 35% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 7 (would increase distributions to available school fund): 74% for and 26% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 8 (creates flood infrastructure fund): 77% for and 23% against with 169 of 254 precincts reported.

8:47 p.m.

162 of 254 counties statewide are reporting results, according to the Texas Secretary of State’s website.

15 Travis County polling places are still open and processing voters.

8:24 p.m.

Texas Prop 1 (would allow municipal judges to hold multiple offices): 65% against and 35% for with 116 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 2 (Water development bonds): 65% for and 35% against with 116 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 3 (property tax exemption for disaster areas): 86% for and 14% against with 116 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 4 (would prohibit state income tax on individuals): 73% for and 27% against with 116 of 254 precincts reported.

8:13 p.m.

50 Travis County polling places are still open and processing voters. The remaining 104 locations are in various stages of closing.

8:05 p.m.

Texas Prop 1 (would allow municipal judges to hold multiple offices): 66% for and 34% against with 84 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 2 (Water development bonds): 66% for and 34% against with 84 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 3 (property tax exemption for disaster areas): 87% for and 13% against with 84 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 4 (would prohibit state income tax on individuals): 73% for and 27% against with 84 of 254 precincts reported.

Texas Prop 5 (would dedicate sporting goods sales tax to parks): 86% for and 14% against with 84 of 254 precincts reported.

8 p.m.

City of Pflugerville Mayor: Victor Gonzales with 65% of the vote and Brad Marshall with 35% of the vote. Two precincts out of 17 have reported.

Manor ISD Proposition A: Early voting totals show 67% for and 33% against the bond.

Del Valle ISD Proposition A: Early voting totals show 73% for and 27% against the bond.

Burnet CISD Proposition A: A total of 51% are against and 49% are for the bond with 3 of 21 precincts reporting.

Lockhart ISD Bond Election: Early voting shows 55% against and 45% for the bond.

Coupland ISD Proposition A: With 1 of 3 precincts reporting, 59% have voted for the bond and 41% have voted against it.

Prairie Lea ISD Proposition A: So far 62% have voted for and 48% have voted against the bond with 2 of 6 precincts reporting.

7:56 p.m.

Austin Prop A: Early voting totals have 65% for and 35% against with no precincts reported yet.

City of Kyle City Council, District 1: Dex Ellison wins with 54% of the votes and all 19 precincts reported. City of Kyle City Council, District 3, Robert Rizo wins with 61% of the votes and all 19 precincts reported.

City of San Marcos City Council, Place 1: Mark Gleason wins with 56% of the votes and all 21 precincts reported. City of San Marcos City Council, Place 2: Devin Barrett wins with 66% of the votes and all 21 precincts reported.

7:44 p.m.

Austin Proposition B: Early voting totals have 57% for and 43% against the proposition.

Travis County Proposition A: Early voting totals indicate 63% voted for and 37% voted against the proposition.

7:37 p.m.

Local mayoral early result leaders:

  • Jonestown: Paul Johnson, 100 votes
  • Lago Vista: Edward (Ed) Tidwell, 408 votes
  • Manor: Larry Wallace Jr., 85 votes
  • Pflugerville: Victor Gonzales, 340 votes
  • Point Venture: Eric Love, 93 votes

7:33 p.m.

Williamson County: Early voting results indicate voters will approve Proposition A, with a total of 13,761 for and 7,255 votes against.

Williamson County: Early voting results indicate voters will approve Proposition B, with a total of 12,459 votes for and 8,530 votes against.

Travis County: Early voting totals indicate that Travis County voters will approve Proposition A, with a vote of 28,046.

7:23 p.m.

Results for statewide and local elections are coming in. See Election Day results of 10 key Texas propositions here.

6:52 p.m.

Williamson County voters explained why they were for or against the two propositions on the ballot providing a total of $447 million to parks and roads.

3:52 p.m.

A view of the scene at the Williamson County Jester Annex in Round Rock. Officials told KXAN’s Will DuPree that estimated wait times for voters is over 45 minutes.

3:47 p.m.

The Travis County Clerk’s Office is reporting that over 42,000 voters cast their ballots as of 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. Additionally, the office is reminding voters that polls are open until 7 p.m.

2 p.m.

The Travis County Clerk’s Office says that it’s been made aware of issues releated to printing of ballot cards at the Volente Fire Department Vote Center.

The office says that at 7:13 a.m. on Tuesday, poll workers contacted Election Central to advise that they were experiencing issues printing ballot cards. The call center reportedly walked the poll worker through the established process for resetting the printer and directed them to carefully review each ballot on printing to make sure that voters are issued the correct ballot style.

According to the office, while working, the poll worker noted that several of the ballots being generated were the incorrect ballot style, and those ballots were spoiled and re-issued correctly. The poll worker did not make follow-up contact with Election Central, but instead spoiled any incorrect ballots and reissued them correctly, and voters continued to vote.

Then, the office says, at 8:55 a.m., a voter phoned the Call Center to report that they were given the wrong ballot style at the fire department and they spoiled the ballot. A technical troubleshooter was dispatched to the polling center and the issue was resolved by 10:05 a.m.

The Travis County Clerk’s Office said in part: “Our preliminary investigation has revealed that this situation arose due to a printer set-up configuration issue, and it was called to our attention because a voter did what we asked them to do: verify their ballot. Travis County has established redundant procedures to ensure that our voters are able to vote accurately. In this case, the system worked – the pollworker, the first line of defense, noticed an anomaly and called Election Central. They were given clear instructions on how to ensure that correct ballot styles were issued. The voters, the second line of defense, verified this. There are 497 registered voters eligible to vote in the Village of Volente election, and their votes will be counted.”

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