Raw turkey products linked to drug-resistant salmonella infections

National News
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ALBUQUERUQUE, N.M. (KRQE) — The Center for Disease Control announced on November 8 that they are investigating an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella infections that could be linked to raw turkey products.

The CDC says the illnesses in the outbreak have run from November 20, 2017, to October 20, 2018, and that raw turkey from various sources have been the cause of the illnesses that have been reported in 35 states.

A total of 164 cases of Salmonella Reading were reported with one death being reported from California.

While a single supplier of raw turkey has not been identified, the CDC’s investigation revealed the outbreak has been confirmed in samples of raw turkey pet food, raw turkey products, and live turkeys.

This leads the CDC to the conclusion that the illness is widespread within the turkey industry.

The Center for Disease Control has issued the following procedures to prevent infections from raw turkey:

  • Wash hands thoroughly, infections can spread from one person to another
  • Cook turkey thoroughly. Whole turkeys, turkey breasts, ground turkey etc should always be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Reheat leftovers at the same temperature.
  • Washing raw poultry is not recommended as germs in raw juices can spread to other foods 
  • Do not thaw a turkey on a counter. Thaw turkey in the refrigerator or in the microwave.
  • Do not feed raw foods to pets. Animals can also contract Salmonella.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection

  • Diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps usually appear within 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the Salmonella bacteria.
  • Most people recover from the illness without treatment and it usually lasts 4 to 7 days.
  • Some may experience severe diarrhea that may require hospitalization as the infection may spread from intestines to the bloodstream.
  • Young children and seniors are more likely to have severe symptoms.

For additional information on the illness, click here to visit the CDC’s information page on Salmonella.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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