LinkedIn: More people are looking to change careers now than at any time in recent history

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FILE – In this Sept. 22, 2021, file photo, prospective employers and job seekers interact during a job fair in the West Hollywood section of Los Angeles. California has been averaging more than 100,000 new jobs each month since February. New data released Friday, Oct. 22, 2021, by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows California is now tied with Nevada for the highest unemployment rate in the country at 7.5%. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

AUSTIN (KXAN) — If you’re unhappy in your job and looking for something different, you’re not alone.

A new survey by professional networking website LinkedIn shows 37% of its users are looking to change their careers by exploring new possibilities, looking for a new job, or looking for a new role within their company.

“Just coming out of a pandemic, and people being forced to sit at home with their thoughts and their jobs, with fewer distractions, allowed them to really have the thoughts around, ‘is this really what I want to do with my career,'” said Career Coach Julie Bauke.

Bauke added that with many employers desperate to fill open positions and keep the employees they have, now is a great time to try something new.

She said Generation Z and Millennials are especially eager to move in a different direction compared to older workers.

What’s more, women seem to be more impacted than men. Women made 10 percent more career changes than men since the start of the pandemic.

“Everything sort of came together and boiled over,” Bauke said. “The impact on women was even greater and so they are more likely to be saying right now, ‘I’m done, I’ve got to find something else that will allow me to actually manage my life and now feel like I’m losing my mind on a daily basis.'”

When compared to last year, the LinkedIn survey found career transitions are up 50 percent, the most since the company was launched in 2003.

Bauke said for some it’s obvious that it’s time to make a change. For example, some of her clients cry before heading into the office, or spend the weekend dreading Monday.

However, for others it’s not as obvious.

“You really have to do an internal check,” she said. “Is this allowing me to be the best me, am I showing up fully every day, and if not, what can I change, what is within my power to change to get to that state,” she said.

As for when you finally decide it’s time, Bauke said you need to keep self-reflecting to figure out what works for you.

“Sort of that retrospective, where you say, ‘where and how have I been the happiest and most successful, and how can I then find that in another job,'” she said. “So really just a good hard conversation with yourself.”

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